Jlel12
Posts: 3
Joined: Tue Dec 07, 2021 3:24 am

Contacts at Chevrolet for Spark EV warranty guidance?

Hi all,

I recently bought a 2016 LT1 through Vroom, and last week, I took the car to my local Chevy dealership (Superior Chevrolet, Decatur, GA) to get an all-points inspection + a traction battery condition check during the 7-day return window. The technician reported that the car's battery is reporting 65% of original capacity, via the GDS diagnostic tool. (I tend to trust this estimate - the dealership knew what check I wanted run, scheduled me for a specific day when the technician who could run it was there, the guy said to me "this is what GDS reports", GDS2 is what's referenced in the various TSBs that have been posted here, etc.)

Now, I don't actually think this is a problem yet. I've got more than two years left on the warranty (confirmed through my Chevrolet account). The car's range is also frankly more than sufficient for what I need it to do - it's a second, "run-about-town" car, and my area has surprisingly good EV infrastructure. However, I would really like to be confident that I'll be able to exercise my warranty rights in the next few years when the car finally gets below 60% (so I can drive it happily for another 8+ years!). So, I'm trying to get Chevrolet to give me in writing a) what the threshold for warranty traction battery service is, and b) what I need to do to exercise these warranty rights.

Since then, I've found myself in a peculiar circle of hell where I'm trapped between three different customer service reps at Chevy - two of whom are lovely and really trying to help me, one of who is breathtakingly incompetent. Each of these people has passed me inadvertently to the other two people at least once already. None of them have any idea what the process to get a traction battery serviced under warranty is, and cannot figure out who can answer this question.

So, what I'm hoping you all can help me with: Has anyone on this forum found someone at Chevy Corporate who *actually* knows how to deal with Spark EV warranty claims? Or some other way to get someone with decision-making authority at Chevy on the phone? I've searched the forum pretty exhaustively, and the two most relevant things I've seen are:
  • niik's description of how he got his 2014 battery serviced (sounded like "beat the dealers over the head until they actually do their jobs")https://www.mychevysparkev.com/forum/vi ... lay#p28587
  • A mention of the @ChevyElectric handle on twitter getting people some traction
Any other recommendations very much appreciated!
MrDRMorgan
Posts: 1205
Joined: Wed Oct 30, 2013 7:27 am
Location: Manteca in Central California

Re: Contacts at Chevrolet for Spark EV warranty guidance?

Jlel12 wrote: Sun Jan 09, 2022 1:38 pm Hi all,

I recently bought a 2016 LT1 through Vroom, and last week, I took the car to my local Chevy dealership (Superior Chevrolet, Decatur, GA) to get an all-points inspection + a traction battery condition check during the 7-day return window. The technician reported that the car's battery is reporting 65% of original capacity, via the GDS diagnostic tool. (I tend to trust this estimate - the dealership knew what check I wanted run, scheduled me for a specific day when the technician who could run it was there, the guy said to me "this is what GDS reports", GDS2 is what's referenced in the various TSBs that have been posted here, etc.)

Now, I don't actually think this is a problem yet. I've got more than two years left on the warranty (confirmed through my Chevrolet account). The car's range is also frankly more than sufficient for what I need it to do - it's a second, "run-about-town" car, and my area has surprisingly good EV infrastructure. However, I would really like to be confident that I'll be able to exercise my warranty rights in the next few years when the car finally gets below 60% (so I can drive it happily for another 8+ years!). So, I'm trying to get Chevrolet to give me in writing a) what the threshold for warranty traction battery service is, and b) what I need to do to exercise these warranty rights.

Since then, I've found myself in a peculiar circle of hell where I'm trapped between three different customer service reps at Chevy - two of whom are lovely and really trying to help me, one of who is breathtakingly incompetent. Each of these people has passed me inadvertently to the other two people at least once already. None of them have any idea what the process to get a traction battery serviced under warranty is, and cannot figure out who can answer this question.

So, what I'm hoping you all can help me with: Has anyone on this forum found someone at Chevy Corporate who *actually* knows how to deal with Spark EV warranty claims? Or some other way to get someone with decision-making authority at Chevy on the phone? I've searched the forum pretty exhaustively, and the two most relevant things I've seen are:
  • niik's description of how he got his 2014 battery serviced (sounded like "beat the dealers over the head until they actually do their jobs")https://www.mychevysparkev.com/forum/vi ... lay#p28587
  • A mention of the @ChevyElectric handle on twitter getting people some traction
Any other recommendations very much appreciated!
As I recall, a replacement battery for a 2016 Spark EV only needs to have a capacity that is 10% higher than the battery it replaces. If true, you could end up with a battery only having 70% capacity - not a new full capacity battery. 60% capacity for the original battery is about 11.1 kWh.

My 2016 Spark EV currently has a capacity of 13.9 kWh (as measured by TorquePro) at 37k miles. This equates to a full-charge GOM range of ~50 miles given use of the heater and lights in our current cold weather in Central California.

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