DC fast charge option installed successfully

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noisette123

Member
Joined
Nov 30, 2015
Messages
8
Good news for Chevy Spark EV owners not having the CCS combo 1 DC Fast charge option installed on their cars.

Our shop successfully converted the first Chevy Spark EV to include the Fast Charge option , with 8 hours on labor (learning, recabling , jonction box replacement ...)

The next install should be quicker, as we know what cables to reroute, install and what needs to be replaced.

We are located in Quebec, Trois Rivieres.

Would you be interested in upgrading your car? If so, please let me know, so that we may explore making this available to USA and Canada owners

Cheers!

Jean-Francois.
 
This will be great for some owners !

Is this a kit of parts from Chevy and a SW upgrade from Chevy?
Do the displays work just like a factory DCFC Spark EV?
Does the status of the charging rate and SOC percentage display on the DCFC station ?

There is this protocol between car and station where it locks the cord into the car and the park brake gets set automatically.
I would think a whole new SW load would have to be installed in the car.
 
Yes NORTON,

It works exactly like a factory installed DC Quick charge CCS model. The main dashboard LCD displays the COMBO plug, the charge status, it also automatically puts the Parking Brake prior to charging,etc...
 
NORTON said:
This will be great for some owners !

Is this a kit of parts from Chevy and a SW upgrade from Chevy?

No, it is not a kit. But the junction box holding the DC Contactor and PCB controller needs to be ordered from Chevy, all the rest of the cabling needs to be built and routed to quite a few location within the car...

Do the displays work just like a factory DCFC Spark EV?

YES :)


Does the status of the charging rate and SOC percentage display on the DCFC station ?

YES :)


There is this protocol between car and station where it locks the cord into the car and the park brake gets set automatically.
I would think a whole new SW load would have to be installed in the car.

It is handled thru the main controller within the DC contactor box. A set a wires also runs thru the parking brake for automatic activation.
 
Some questions.

1. How much will this cost?

2. Will it void the warranty?

3. Can the user perform the mod, or does one need to take it to Quebec?

4. Does it work with all years? 2014 has different battery than 2015/2016.
 
SparkevBlogspot said:
Some questions.

1. How much will this cost?

Around 2000$, it is an 8 hour job, recabling, crimping connectors, replacing the main contactor junction box.

2. Will it void the warranty?

Will need to check with Chevy, nothing aftermaket is used, only Genuine Chevy parts. So my best guess is NO.

3. Can the user perform the mod, or does one need to take it to Quebec?

User mod will not be possible unless he owns a lift, special crimp tools, etc... The plan is to offer the service here in Quebec in 2-3 months

4. Does it work with all years? 2014 has different battery than 2015/2016.

YES, 2014-2015/16.
 
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I think it would void the powertrain and/or battery warranty. The electrical system is being heavily modified in an totally unintended way.

Also the price is 2x what the factory charges. Better to just get one with dcfs from the get go.
 
I know this is a really old thread, but has anybody come across instructions for doing this? Noisette seems like they're being tight lipped about how to do this, but presumably they did do it right? Has anyone since tried to replicate this?

So far everything I've found indirectly leads back to this thread.
 
I know this is a really old thread, but has anybody come across instructions for doing this? Noisette seems like they're being tight lipped about how to do this, but presumably they did do it right? Has anyone since tried to replicate this?

So far everything I've found indirectly leads back to this thread.
Yes, they did. The company that does the service is https://ingenext.ca/ . Their engineers only work with in-person customers despite all the advertising on the forum and Weber Auto YouTube channel comments. It's funny, when I first inquired they suggested I drive 4,700 km to their shop in Montreal and wouldn't consult with me remotely, even when I offered to pay for time initially. Ghosted afterward. Besides lockdowns and restrictions being at their peak at the time, I would have had to get my car shipped and fly, or charge 55-70 times off of AC charging just to have them "look" at the car.. inconceivable.

Sylvain Belanger is one of the few correspondents active on social media. He dropped the most affirmative breadcrumbs on the topic. He even spoke with Prof John Kelly, the owner of the Weber Auto YT channel about Bolt EV DCFC conversions (now known as @Draxknor), which is a nearly identical process and I can confirm that from the service manual data I've looked through.

I have a feeling Noisette123 is Sylvain (nvm, they signed off as Jean Francois in another forum post), who is from the same company (ingenext.ca for parts or the not-for-anglophones EV shop and dealer simonandre.ca). He, shared this photo below from LinkedIn. I have my own photos of my sourced equipment but this is a nice succinct shot all in one place. As an aside, I love the attach file feature that released with the MyChevySparkEV forum refresh. I'll have to start using this over imgur.

I'm about 4/5 done with the physical upgrade for my own 2015 Spark EV, I've just been sitting on the last bit for a bit as I have been investigating programming requirements.

What do you want to know? I can probably share a lot about this topic from my independent sleuthing and documenting.

Remove and replace: modules and harness part numbers, where to find at a good price, hardware needed for install (socket #'s and jacks / stands)
Source broken: Replace Connector shell, retaining clip, and wire pin to be crimped.
Building Wire harnesses: How long and what grade of wire, custom hook-up or off-the-shelf cable w/ twisted pairs, color code conventions, loom size, cable gland type of choice (standard vs corrugated tube), connector building and crimp tools to use.
Routing harnesses: Best locations for accessibility
Programming: 3rd party programmer recommendation and where to find OEM firmware to upload.
General Part #'s and info

This info can translate over into the Bolt EV, and as a matter of fact, some parts are exchangeable with the Spark EV. The biggest difference is related to the on-board charger and its "new" communication protocol that uses PWM instead of CAN which also extends to the Chevy Volt's Gen 2 on-board chargers (the 3.7kW and larger 7.2kW unit cross-compatible with the Bolt).
 

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Oh, this is great! Yeah, any information you can provide to help DIY the retrofit would be great! To what extent are you finding OEM parts? Sounds like you might be building your own wiring harnesses; is this to save money?

I think starting with what parts you need and a general procedure would be really helpful. I can't tell from the photos above what the large box on the right is: is that BMS related? 😱

I'm also curious if you recommend getting access to a service manual? I found a print version for $400 😵‍💫 and a digital access version for $20/year
 
To what extent are you finding OEM parts?
I confirmed compatibility between Bolt and Spark with the help of service manuals and online listings, then discriminated which to source based on availability and price.

My batch of parts were sourced from Ingenext, because the price including shipping all from one place, was the best at the time, and the clear pictures and descriptions helped mitigate my risk. However, you'd be just as successful on eBay or by calling a scrap car lot with either of the EVs as a fallback. Sometimes they offer parts for next to nothing, like in 2021, I was offered a 7.2kW Bolt EV on-board charger for $250 CAD (not for DCFC ofcourse). Scrapyards are convenient because they often have the inventory of yards across the region, and you don't need to call location after location looking for parts, they'll tell you. Or even the need to invest in a donor car for parts and manage all the equipment and space to house it, recoup costs by selling bits and pieces you don't need ... forget it!

I then fleshed out what sub-components I needed locally or from DigiKey, Mouser, or Waytek Wire. The intent was to minimize cost and leverage national or local parts first before getting the full price quoted via the dealer over the phone or through one of many pop-up e-commerce dealer sites (GM Parts Warehouse, GM Parts House, GM Parts Center, GM Parts Wholescale Canada, etc, dealername.com/oem-parts).
Sounds like you might be building your own wiring harnesses; is this to save money?
Negative, it's because of scarcity. The wire harness for fast charging only exists in cars that got the upgrade, and I have not found PN's for these harnesses. Further, the loom/harness would likely be an amalgamation of many other harnesses going to different modules in the engine bay, so it's a necessary part of the project until more details arise. I didn't need to build my own wire harness, I could have gotten a 3rd party to make me a set. However, as a matter of choice, this was more practical over contracting a 3rd party to make wire harnesses as a service.

Ingenext charged me 338 CA$ for a Bolt EV charge port with fast charging, 657 CA$ for the Power Control Module, and 275 CA$ 175 CA$ for a damaged charge port wire harness with provisions for fast charging (and the J1772 latch lock), with the connector replacement only costing me 5 CA$ from the distributors I mentioned above.

After petty parts and wires, $30 shipping a $160 programmer from elsewhere, and excluding jacks and jack stands I've had for years for my other cars, project cost is just about 1500 CA$. That would easily be doubled with brand new parts from the dealer. For used parts it will never be exactly the same. It's quite possible to get the same for less.
I think starting with what parts you need and a general procedure would be really helpful.
Yeah I was going to do something to that effect eventually, but I wanted to make sure your question was answered in the interim, since you revived the topic. It probably deserves its own thread.
Very briefly, and don't buy from these links, its another generic dealer e-commerce site.

  • HPDM "Power Control Module" w/ fast charging (23453239) , ingenext
  • Bolt EV (24293153, 24293154) or Spark EV (24278342) Charge Port, ingenext. note the price, if it is an assembly, it includes the harness in the next line item.
  • Wire harness for the charge port with provisions for fast charging, and the J1772 latch lock (95241674), Ingenext
You can paste the part numbers into ingenext's website which has been a decent reference starting out. if you're checking their stock aside from ebay, their links will probably break over time as they are not persistent links. Also they don't list broken items all the time, so you can try contacting them and asking for specific items and for what it's worth broken for big savings.
I can't tell from the photos above what the large box on the right is: is that BMS related? 😱
Jump to 11:30 and Prof Kelly will show you what it looks like inside (the Bolt EV version)
The box is the High Power Distribution Module, but GM often calls it the Power Control Module or even the DC Charger which it is responsible for nothing of the sort. They have horrible naming conventions for all their parts. This box contains fuses for the AC compressor, heater, and ~350V-12V DC-DC step-down converter, a bus bar, current sensor, and contactors (switches) that will energize the cable leading to the charge port.
before after.png
Power Control Module s-l1600.jpgpower control module side.jpg
Here's a polished photo of the HPDM / PCM. It was an expensive and very ugly-looking box for something that is perched where an engine is supposed to be, so it gets to be polished. Also note X6 and X7 are the connector-ends of the wire harnesses that need to be built.

On the AC-only Spark EVs, it is just a connector box with the fuses and busbar inside, no logic.


is that BMS related?
Nope, rest assured all BMS stuff is together with the battery modules under the seats that will never need to be touched.
I'm also curious if you recommend getting access to a service manual? I found a print version for $400 😵‍💫 and a digital access version for $20/year
Go digital for a project like this. You can search for keywords and even save images for referencing and organizing your work.

Alldatadiy has a new years promotion, HAPPY2024 for "24" percent off. Save even more if you buy it with Canadian dollars because they think we're still in the year 2012 where 1 USD = 1 CAD. But if you can get it for $20/year that's the best deal, assuming the user interface is decent, because that could just as easily be a deal breaker.
 
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Well thank you so so much for all the details. This is a GD treasure trove of information.

I've got parts on order and I've managed to get used OEM parts for around $500 US! (Plus shipping and taxes 😭)

I do have 2 more questions about getting this project going.

Can you talk a little about what software is needed and where to get it?

I'm also wondering about these wiring harnesses. You said you made them yourself, so I'm wondering where you got the details for them. Are they in the service manual?

Thanks!

BTW, for anybody else following along and curious, I found these two videos from professor Kelley that are extremely helpful.

A discussion of high voltage PPE was a helpful review for me:


And the HV disconnect procedure for the battery pack. It's roughly the first half of the video where he talks about disconnecting the traction battery from the rest of the power electronics.


He also talks about loss of isolation diagnostics which mostly just makes me feel better about GM's engineering
 
I've got parts on order and I've managed to get used OEM parts for around $500 US! (Plus shipping and taxes )
That's a great deal. Make sure to carefully inspect the parts and note any damaged connectors or wires, as that may require some repairs or replacements to get operational.

Can you talk a little about what software is needed and where to get it?
I'm using a VCX Nano which, unlike OBD II scanners, has more hardware for programming and is controlled by a PC/laptop via USB or wi-fi.
This is a stripped-down knockoff clone of GM's official MDI programmer which is much much more expensive dealer programmer responsible for this job.

The software required is a cracked version (or genuine from https://www.acdelcotds.com/subscriptions) of AC Delco's GDS2 (Global Diagnostic System), and VX Manager + drivers for the VCX Nano. There are alternatives to the Nano that I've heard on other forums, but I haven't investigated them. The VCX Nano programmer includes the software in a physical USB, as well as through links on the vxdiag and vxdiagshop websites. I'm doing this all in a virtual machine such as VMware Workstation Player or Oracle VM VirtualBox. The virtual machine is optional but strongly recommended. It's just smart to contain all of this in a sandbox, especially when dealing with cracked industrial software from a 3rd party of a 3rd party originating from China. The Nano can be bought from the website directly, or through shops on your usual e-commerce platforms like Aliexpress and Ebay,... and Amazon. Vxdiag frequently puts their programmers on sale, so take note of the relative prices.

A genuine subscription to AC Delco's SPS2 might be needed, but I still need to verify this once I fully explore what VX Manager and the cracked software can do.

I'm also wondering about these wiring harnesses. You said you made them yourself, so I'm wondering where you got the details for them. Are they in the service manual?
Correct, I built the wire harnesses based on the component / in-line connector end views and electrical schematics available from the online service manuals. It lists the pinout, circuit #'s, wire size, wire colors for those pins, and includes the MPN for the connectors themselves.
The connectors for X6 and X7 will list all the missing circuits needed. They can splice into several locations in the engine, but the best locations with everything in one place is X1 and X2 under the driver's seat.

I've got a spreadsheet with my own wire color convention for the harness circuits, but at a later on I can clean it up and share it so others can jump over this reverse-engineering step.

If you get the used parts installed before I make a post with more details, just holler at me and I can expedite that.
 
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